COVID-19 (coronavirus) information for consumers

This page offers advice and guidance to consumers on their rights in relation to cancellations caused by COVID-19 restrictions.

We are aware that many businesses are struggling to process the high number of cancellations at this time. We ask that consumers contact the business by email or its website where possible, rather than by phone, and try to remain patient. It may take smaller businesses more time to respond because the impact of this pandemic is both unprecedented and complex.

The ACCC is alert to any instances of unfair or unconscionable conduct on the part of businesses in dealing with consumers during the current crisis.

Travel cancellations and changes

Find out more about cancellations for purchases made via a third-party booking site .
  • If your travel is cancelled the ACCC expects that consumers will receive a refund or other remedy, such as a credit note or voucher, in most circumstances. In some cases, consumers will have the right to receive a refund, rather than a credit note or voucher. For example, you may be entitled to a refund under the terms and conditions of your ticket.
  • If you had a right to a refund under these terms and conditions at the time you purchased your ticket, businesses are not permitted to change the terms at a later time to deny you a refund.
  • Similarly, if you were previously told by a business that you would receive a refund for your cancelled travel, the business is not permitted to later deny you the promised refund.
  • Depending on your circumstances, you may also have other rights under common law, contract or state legislation.
  • Travel cancellations due to government restrictions do impact your rights under the consumer guarantee provisions of the Australian Consumer Law. However, you may have other remedies, including potential rights to a refund, outside of the consumer guarantees, as explained above.
  • You should check your terms and conditions, and any previous communications with the business, and contact the business directly to request a remedy. This may be a refund or credit note or voucher, depending on your circumstances.
  • If you receive a credit note or voucher, it should have an expiration date which is long enough to allow you to use the credit note or voucher.
  • State and territory consumer protection agencies may be able to assist with guidance or conciliation involving relevant state legislation. Consumers may also wish to seek independent legal advice about whether they may have a remedy under common law, contract or state legislation.
  • The ACCC encourages all businesses to treat consumers fairly in these exceptional circumstances.
  • You should first approach the provider of the related service to see if they are prepared to offer a refund, replacement service or voucher.
  • You should also check whether you are covered under any travel insurance policy.
  • You may be entitled to compensation for these expenses under the Australian Consumer Law but this will depend on the specific circumstances. This is unlikely to be the case where the travel is cancelled due to government restrictions.
  • Many travel service providers have short-term COVID-19 policies allowing for credits or refunds which do not apply to bookings after a certain date, as the travel service provider does not yet have certainty as to whether future travel will be cancelled. In many cases, these dates have subsequently been extended as travel restrictions remain in place, and travel service providers cancel further services.
  • If you cancel your booking before your travel service is cancelled, this could be classified as a 'change of mind' cancellation and this could limit your ability to obtain a refund or a credit.
  • If you are concerned about this, the ACCC recommends that you contact the business you made your booking with to ask:
    • how far out from your travel date will the business confirm the cancellation of your travel, if it is to be cancelled
    • how its cancellation policy will apply if travel restrictions are still in place at the date of your booking and your travel is cancelled
    • what remedies may be available to you if you cancel now as compared to what remedies may be available to you if you wait until the service provider cancels.
  • Depending on your circumstances, it may be in your interests to wait for further updates from your travel service provider before taking any steps to cancel your travel and seek a remedy.
  • If you no longer wish to travel due to concerns about COVID-19, this may be treated as a 'change of mind'.
  • You should contact the provider to see if you are entitled to a remedy such as full or partial refund, credit note or voucher.
  • If you have a health condition that means you are at higher risk you should contact the provider to see if they will offer you a refund or a voucher for a later date.
  • Given the exceptional circumstances, the ACCC encourages all businesses to treat consumers fairly.

Event cancellations

  • If your event is cancelled the ACCC expects that you will receive a refund or other remedy, such as a credit note or voucher, in most circumstances.
  • If the event is cancelled due to government restrictions, this impacts your rights under the consumer guarantees. However, you may also have other remedies outside of the Australian Consumer Law.
  • For example, you may be entitled to a refund under the terms and conditions of your ticket.
  • If you had a right to a refund under these terms and conditions at the time you purchased your ticket, businesses are not permitted to change the terms at a later time to deny you a refund.
  • Depending on your circumstances, you may also have other rights under common law, contract or state legislation.
  • You should contact the business directly to request a refund or other remedy such as a credit note or voucher.
  • If you receive a credit note or voucher, it should have an expiration date which is long enough to allow you to use the credit note or voucher.
  • State and territory consumer protection agencies may be able to assist with guidance or conciliation involving relevant state legislation. Consumers may also wish to seek independent legal advice about whether they may have a remedy under common law, contract or state legislation.
  • Given the exceptional circumstances, the ACCC encourages all businesses to treat consumers fairly.
  • You should first approach your travel or accommodation provider to see if they are prepared to offer a replacement service, refund or voucher.
  • You should also check whether you are covered under any travel insurance policy.
  • You may be entitled to compensation for these expenses under the Australian Consumer Law but this will depend on the specific circumstances. This is unlikely to be the case where the event is cancelled due to government restrictions.
  • If you no longer wish to attend an event due to concerns about COVID-19, this may be treated as a 'change of mind'. You should contact the event organiser to see if you are entitled to a remedy such as full or partial refund, credit note or voucher.
  • If you have a health condition that means you are at higher risk, you should contact the event organiser to see if they will offer you a refund or a voucher for a later date.
  • Given the exceptional circumstances, the ACCC encourages all businesses to treat consumers fairly, including by offering refunds as a goodwill gesture where appropriate.

Product price increases

  • The ACCC cannot prevent or take action to stop excessive pricing, as it has no role in setting prices.
  • In some limited circumstances excessive pricing may be unconscionable, for example where the product is critical to the health or safety of vulnerable consumers.
  • If a business makes misleading claims about the reason for price increases, it will be breaching the Australian Consumer Law.

Gym memberships

I have membership to a gym which has closed down due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • The Australian Consumer Law prohibits businesses from taking payments for goods or services when there are reasonable grounds to believe the services won’t be supplied. This applies whether or not your contract allows you to suspend payments. So you do not have to continue to make regular payments while services have ceased.
  • If payments have been deducted then you should contact the business to have the payments refunded.
  • Membership ‘freeze’ or ‘holding’ fees may be charged by gyms when customers elect to pause their membership, if this is permitted by the terms and conditions.
  • Given many memberships are being paused due to the government restrictions preventing gyms from operating, rather than customers requesting a pause, the ACCC expects that gyms will not charge membership ‘freeze’ or ‘holding’ fees.
  • The ACCC also expects that gyms will refund any such holding fees incorrectly charged since the government restrictions came into effect.
  • If you’ve made an upfront payment that covers the period of the closure then the ACCC expects you will receive a refund or other remedy such as a credit note or voucher. However, if the service has been suspended due to government restrictions, this impacts your rights to a refund under the consumer guarantees. You should look at the terms and conditions of your contract and any cancellation policy announced by the business, and get in touch with them directly. You may also have rights under contract law where the contract can no longer be performed.

Local sporting clubs or associations 

Many local sporting clubs or associations have had to suspend or cancel their 2020 seasons in response to COVID-19 restrictions. This advice is to help consumers understand their rights in relation to suspended, shortened or cancelled seasons.

  • Your rights to a refund under the consumer guarantees may not apply if the activity has stopped due to government restrictions.
  • You should check for a cancellation policy under your membership terms and conditions, and contact the state or national body directly to see if you are entitled to a full or partial refund, credit note or voucher.
  • The ACCC expects that you will be offered a refund or a credit note or voucher for the period that the season is suspended. If you receive a credit note or voucher, this should be applied when the 2020 season recommences, or a future season if the 2020 season remains cancelled.
  • The ACCC encourages state and national bodies, and clubs and associations, to treat consumers fairly in these circumstances and to consider appropriate mechanisms to provide refunds or other remedies such as credit notes or vouchers to consumers.
  • Consumers should also be mindful that the impact of COVID-19 is significant for smaller clubs and associations.
  • If you make regular instalments or payments, the Australian Consumer Law prohibits businesses from taking payments for goods or services when there are reasonable grounds to believe the services won’t be supplied. So you do not have to continue to make regular payments to your club or association while services have ceased.
  • Alternatively, if you wish to continue to financially support your local club during this time, you could continue making payments as a gesture of goodwill, or request that your regular payments be credited towards a future season.
  • If payments have been already been deducted then you should contact the club or association to see if you can have the payments refunded.
  • If your sporting club or association announces that the 2020 season will be resuming, but will be shortened or altered, you may still be entitled to a remedy such as a partial refund, credit note or voucher where the value of the service has been reduced.
  • However, whether you are entitled to a remedy will depend on the particular circumstances of the revised season, any applicable terms and conditions of your membership, and what you receive in exchange for your membership fees. For example, funds paid toward uniform, equipment or insurance costs may be non-refundable given they cover the duration of the season or registration, irrespective of the season length.
  • If your sporting club or association’s season has been cancelled, the ACCC expects that you will receive a refund or other remedy, such as a credit note or voucher for a future season, in most circumstances.
  • If the season is cancelled due to government restrictions, this impacts your rights under the consumer guarantees. However, you may also have other remedies outside of the Australian Consumer Law.
  • You should check for a cancellation policy under your membership terms and conditions, and contact the state or national body directly to see if you are entitled to full or partial refund, credit note or voucher.
  • If you had a right to a refund under these terms and conditions at the time you purchased your membership, the state or national body is not permitted to change the terms at a later time to deny you a refund.
  • You may also have rights under contract law where the contract can no longer be performed.
  • You should contact your club directly if you believe you are entitled to a refund or other remedy, such as a credit voucher to use in a future season. Given the exceptional circumstances, the ACCC encourages the state and national bodies, and clubs and associations, to treat consumers fairly and consider appropriate mechanisms to provide refunds or credit notes to consumers.
  • If you decide you no longer wish to participate in a sporting league due to concerns about COVID-19, this may be treated as a ‘change of mind’. You should contact the state or national body to see if you are entitled to a remedy such as a full or partial refund, credit note or voucher.
  • If you have a health condition that means you are at higher risk, you should contact your sporting club or association to see if they will offer you a refund or a voucher to use at a later date.

Wedding cancellations

  • If your wedding is cancelled due to government restrictions, this impacts your rights under the consumer guarantees. However, you may also have other remedies outside of the Australian Consumer Law.
  • For example, you may be entitled to a refund of your deposit under the terms and conditions of your booking.
  • You should contact the venue directly to request a refund or other remedy, such as a credit note to postpone your wedding to a later date.
  • If you had a right to a refund under the terms and conditions at the time you made your booking, businesses are not permitted to change the terms at a later time to deny you a refund.
  • If you receive a credit note or voucher, it should have an expiration date which is long enough to allow you to use the credit note or voucher.
  • Depending on your circumstances, you may also have other rights under common law, contract or state legislation.
  • For example, you may have rights under contract law where the contract can no longer be performed.
  • State and territory consumer protection agencies may be able to assist with guidance or conciliation involving relevant state legislation. Consumers may also wish to seek independent legal advice about whether they may have a remedy under common law, contract or state legislation.
  • The ACCC encourages all businesses to treat consumers fairly in these exceptional circumstances.
  • You should first approach the provider of each service to see if they are prepared to offer a refund or other remedy, such as credit note or voucher.
  • Whether you are entitled to refund of your deposit will depend on the terms and conditions of your booking with each vendor.
  • You may also have rights under contract law where the contract can no longer be performed.
  • Given the exceptional circumstances, the ACCC encourages all businesses to treat consumers fairly.
  • If a supplier has accepted payment for your wedding dress, they must supply it to you by the date they have indicated or, if no time was specified, within a reasonable timeframe.
  • You should first contact your supplier to ask whether the dress is still able to be delivered and, if so, when you can expect to receive it.
  • If the business advises that your dress can no longer be supplied, then the ACCC expects you will receive a refund or other remedy such as a credit note or voucher.
  • The ACCC understands that many businesses are struggling to manage supply delays at this point in time due to circumstances outside their control. We urge consumers to remain patient and anticipate that it may take longer than usual for goods to be supplied.
  • You are not entitled to a refund under the Australian Consumer Law if you wish to return wedding items that you have purchased but no longer require.
  • Under the Australian Consumer Law, you are only entitled to a remedy if your product fails to meet a consumer guarantee. The remedy you’re entitled to will depend on whether you have a major or minor problem with the product.
  • Please see our FAQ on travel cancellations and changes.
  • Please see our FAQ on travel cancellations and changes.
  • You should first contact your insurer to check whether you are covered for your wedding cancellation under your wedding or event insurance policy.
  • If you disagree with your insurer’s decision you should discuss your complaint with them and explain what you would like the outcome to be. As part of the insurer’s Internal Dispute Resolution they will have a certain number of days to respond to your dispute.
  • If your dispute remains unresolved, you can contact the Australian Financial Complaints Authority (AFCA) for assistance. The AFCA Significant Event Hotline (1800 337 444) provides priority service for those financially impacted by COVID-19 and wish to make a complaint about financial products or services.

Material changes to services

In order to provide services in line with the government restrictions, some service providers have changed the substance of the service consumers had originally contracted them to provide. For example, in person guitar lessons replaced with online guitar lessons, or gym memberships replaced with access to online workout plans.

  • Where there have been changes to the service being provided, the ACCC expects that the business will clearly communicate these changes to its customers.
  • Your rights in relation to a changed service will depend on whether the change is a material change or whether the change has a minimal effect on the business’ ability to provide the service originally contracted for.
  • Where the change is a material change, you may wish to still continue with the service. However, if you do not wish to continue, the ACCC expects that business will not charge you for the changed service where you have advised the business that you do not wish to proceed with the changed service.

Telecommunication services

With many people working from home due to COVID-19, there has been some impact on telecommunications services. We encourage service providers to be open and transparent with customers about any restrictions, limitations or disruptions to telecommunication services.

For people who have a reduced income as a result of losing their job or having their hours reduced, providers have financial hardship assistance programs available if you are not able to pay your bill, and many are offering other help such as waiving late payment fees. Check your provider’s website to see what’s available and how to access it.

  • The quality of internet services in Australia may be affected by increased consumer demand. There are steps you can take to maximise the performance of your home internet service.
  • If you are not receiving the internet service you signed up for, you may also be entitled to certain remedies under consumer guarantees.
  • You should contact your provider in the first instance if you have issues with your internet service.
  • Internet service providers might address your concerns in various ways, for example by offering additional ‘free’ features like unlimited data during the crisis, or a change of plan.
  • If you have not been able to resolve the problem with your service provider, you can lodge a complaint with theTelecommunications Industry Ombudsman.
  • If you are spending increased time in your home, including working from home, you might find that your current mobile or internet plan is no longer suitable, particularly if there are a number of people using the same service in your home.
  • There are many different mobile and internet services available, from entry level with minimal inclusions to high level plans which might include more data, phone calls and other content.
  • If your needs have changed, contact your service provider and see if they have a better plan for you, or see what other providers might be able to offer you.
  • Plans also change over time so if you haven’t compared your existing mobile or internet plan with what’s currently available for a while this might a good time to get a better deal.
  • It is also worth noting that some mobile and internet service providers are increasing data allowance packages for customers.
  • Some video on demand providers have reduced their streaming quality to help manage the total demand on broadband networks during the COVID-19 crisis. This may result in the quality of some streamed video not being as sharp.
  • The reduction in quality may not be very noticeable, so we urge consumers to try to be patient with any temporary disruptions to quality.
  • If you still have concerns, you can seek further information from your provider and discuss potential remedies, including, for example, a change of plan if you are on a subscription service.
  • If you are on a subscription service and believe you are not receiving the service what you signed up for, you may be entitled to certain remedies under the consumer guarantees, depending on your circumstances.
  • If you have not been able to resolve things directly with your service provider, you can lodge a complaint with the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman.
  • Major sporting codes in Australia and overseas have cancelled, suspended or postponed their seasons in response to COVID-19, and this means that many popular live sports are currently not available on subscription service platforms.
  • If you signed up with a subscription service to receive live sports, and these live sports are no longer available, the ACCC expects that you will receive a refund or other remedy, and will not continue to be charged for your subscription while the services cannot be provided.
  • Under the Australian Consumer Law, businesses should not take payments for services when they know they are unable to supply those services, or will only be able to supply materially different services.
  • If you are not receiving what you signed up for, including concerns about any replacement services (e.g. a ‘movies’ package in substitute for live sports), you may be entitled to certain remedies under the consumer guarantees.
  • You should contact your subscription service provider to see if they are prepared to offer a change of plan or other remedy.
  • If you have not been able to resolve things directly with your service provider, you can lodge a complaint with the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman.
  • If you have not already moved to the NBN, you may wish to consider making the move now to boost your download or upload broadband speeds.
  • If you are considering making the move, we would encourage you to shop around for a suitable RSP and plan that meets your needs and budget. We also recommend that you review the tips for consumers on our Moving to the NBN page.
  • You might find that some RSPs are not taking orders for new services due to having limited call centre staff during the COVID-19 crisis, however many RSPs are still accepting NBN orders either online or over the phone.
  • Unless you are already on the NBN, you will likely have been notified of a deadline by which to switch to the NBN or risk having your broadband or voice services disconnected; this has now been put on hold, so don’t worry.
  • For example, Telstra and Optus have ceased mandatory disconnections of services that have remained on their networks beyond their switchover deadline.
  • If your notified deadline falls after the COVID-19 crisis commenced, and you do not switch over to the NBN within that time, you will receive an extension. Your existing service provider will give you a new deadline when it has been decided.
  • Similarly, if you have placed an NBN order within the deadline but it is taking longer to activate your service, your current services will not be subject to mandatory disconnection until your NBN service is connected.

Business closures

Many businesses have been forced to close completely, or to close physical stores and move to online trading only, due to the impact of restrictions associated with COVID-19.

The ACCC encourages businesses to be open and transparent about how any temporary or partial closures affect their day to day operations, and to treat their consumers fairly in these exceptional circumstances.

  • You can cancel your lay-by agreement at any time before you receive the products. If you cancel the lay-by, the business must refund your deposit and all other amounts you’ve paid except any applicable termination fee.
  • You should check the terms and conditions of your lay-by agreement before contacting the business to cancel your lay-by.
  • If you wish to retain your lay-by for when the business resumes trade, the terms and conditions of your lay-by agreement continue to apply.
  • However, the ACCC expects businesses to treat consumers fairly, and not terminate the lay-by agreement during the closure period if consumers can’t make scheduled payments in the circumstances.
  • If you have paid for services in advance, the business may still be able to supply the services when it reopens. If this is the case, the ACCC expects the business to extend the validity period of the pre-payments to allow for the period the business was unable to provide the services.
  • If you make regular payments by subscription or otherwise for services which are not being provided because the business has temporarily closed, these payments should not continue to be deducted by the business.
  • If you would prefer to have your pre-payments refunded, you will need to check the terms and conditions of your pre-payment agreement and speak to the business to check what they may be prepared to offer.
  • The ACCC expects all businesses to honour and extend gift card expiry dates to cover any period that the card was unable to be used due to the business's closure.
  • If you have a gift card which will expire while a business is in hibernation, you may wish to contact the business directly to negotiate an alternative arrangement.
  • Many businesses are continuing to trade in some capacity, so you may still be able to use your gift card or voucher even if the business’s physical stores are closed.
  • However, if you are unable to use your gift card or voucher because of the terms and conditions the business has placed on it (for example, a gift card that can only be used in a physical store where the business is trading in an online capacity only during the COVID-19 restrictions), the ACCC expects the business to provide you with some form of remedy, such as:
    • reimbursement of the amount remaining on the gift card or voucher
    • extending the expiry period of the gift card or voucher to give it an expiration date which is long enough to allow you to use the credit note or voucher
    • amending the terms and conditions on the gift card or voucher to enable you to use it online.
  • Under the Australian Consumer Law, you are entitled to a remedy if your product fails to meet a consumer guarantee. These consumer guarantee rights continue to apply even where a business’s physical stores are temporarily closed.
  • If you have purchased a faulty product, you may be entitled to a repair, replacement or refund. The remedy you’re entitled to will depend on whether you have a major or minor problem with a product.
  • You are not entitled to a consumer guarantee remedy if you have simply changed your mind, found it cheaper somewhere else, decided you did not like the purchase, or had no use for it.
  • In most cases, you can choose to seek a remedy from the retailer you purchased it from, or directly from the manufacturer.
  • You are generally responsible for returning the product if it can be posted or easily returned.
  • However, where a product is too large, too heavy or too difficult to remove, the business is responsible for paying the shipping costs or collecting the product within a reasonable time of being notified of the problem.
  • You should contact the retailer or manufacturer directly to discuss the options available to return your faulty product, and to obtain a repair, replacement or refund.
  • Given the exceptional circumstances, the ACCC encourages businesses to implement appropriate mechanisms to assist consumers seeking to return faulty products.
  • Please see our guidance for further information on repairs, replacements and refunds.
  • If a business has possession of your item for repair or alteration, you should first check the terms and conditions of your contract with the service provider to see when you are entitled to get the item back.
  • You may also have rights under the Australian Consumer Law. The consumer guarantees provide that services such as repairs and alterations must be delivered in a reasonable time when there is no agreed end date.
  • If the service has not yet been provided by the business and is unlikely to be delivered in a reasonable time, you may be entitled to cancel the contract, have any money already paid refunded to you, and the item returned — although this position will be different if the business is prevented from supplying services as a direct result of Government restrictions.
  • If the service has been already been provided by the business, you may be required to complete payment of any unpaid amounts before being entitled to get the item back.
  • The ACCC expects that, given the exceptional circumstances, once you have fully paid for the service, the business should make reasonable endeavours to return your item to you, even if its physical stores are temporarily closed. This could include providing a way for you to collect the item in person, or delivering the item to you where appropriate.
  • You should contact the business directly to discuss options for the return of your item.
  • Depending on your circumstances, you may also have rights under common law, contract or state bailment legislation.
  • State and territory consumer protection agencies may be able to assist with guidance involving relevant state legislation. Consumers may also wish to seek independent legal advice about whether they may have a remedy under common law, contract or state legislation.
  • If a business has possession of your item as collateral for a cash loan, you should first check the terms and conditions of your contract.
  • If a business has possession of your item as collateral for a cash loan and you have not yet repaid the loan, you are generally not entitled to have the item returned until you make all repayments according to the terms and conditions of the loan.
  • If you have repaid your loan, the ACCC expects you will not be required to continue paying interest on the loan while it is in the business’s possession and they are temporarily closed. The ACCC also expects the business will use reasonable endeavours to return the item to you. This could include providing a way for you to collect the item in person, or delivering the item to you where appropriate.
  • If a business has become insolvent, you may become an ‘unsecured creditor’ if you have:
    • bought or received a gift card and have not used it
    • been issued with a credit note
    • paid in advance for products or services.
  • If the business continues to trade under control of an external administrator, you may still receive products or services that you paid for, and/or still be able to use gift cards or credit notes. However, the business may also refuse to accept gift cards or credits as a form of payment.
  • Whether and how the business will honour specific transactions will be announced by the external administrator. You should follow the directions given by the administrator for these transactions. For example, the administrator may honour gift cards by requiring an additional dollar be spent for every dollar used on the gift card.
  • If the business ceases trading, consumers will generally become unsecured creditors. You will need to register with the external administrator as an ordinary unsecured creditor to seek to recover your money. The insolvency process will determine whether you receive any payment at all. The Corporations Act 2001 regulates the order in which external administrators and liquidators repay money owed by a company to secured and unsecured creditors.
  • Please see our guidance on when a business goes bust for further information.

Third-party booking sites

Many website platform operators offer booking facilities for services or experiences carried out by other businesses. Many of these services or experiences have now been cancelled due to government restrictions.

In this situation, you will need to seek a remedy from the third-party booking site, as this is the service provider from whom you made your purchase.

  • If a business has cancelled the service or experience you have booked with them through a third-party booking site, the ACCC expects that you will receive a refund or other remedy, such as a credit note or voucher, from the third-party booking site.
  • In some cases, you may have the right to receive a refund, rather than a credit note or voucher, as you may be entitled to a refund under the terms and conditions of purchase or booking through the third-party booking site.
  • If you had a right to a refund under the terms and conditions at the time you made your purchase from the third-party booking site, the booking site is not permitted to change the terms at a later time to deny you a refund.
  • Where the service or experience has been cancelled by the provider due to government restrictions, you are unlikely to have a right to a refund from the booking site under the consumer guarantee provisions of the Australian Consumer Law.
  • You should check your terms and conditions and contact the third-party booking site directly to request a remedy. This may be a refund or credit note or voucher, depending on your circumstances.
  • If you receive a credit note or voucher, it should have an expiry date which is long enough to allow you to use the credit note or voucher.
  • State and territory consumer protection agencies may be able to assist with guidance or conciliation involving relevant state legislation.
  • Consumers may also wish to seek independent legal advice about whether they may have a remedy under other laws, such as the law that applies to frustration of contract.
  • Given the exceptional circumstances, the ACCC encourages all businesses to treat consumers fairly.

Still have issues or concerns?

You can contact the ACCC with consumer and small business questions or concerns relating to the COVID-19 pandemic.

More information

Flight delays & cancellations

MoneySmart - Travel insurance

ACCC/AER position statement on COVID-19

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