Recalls

3000 Takata airbags a day replaced in Australian cars

Australia’s largest ever recall is now well underway with new figures released today detailing the first quarter of compulsory Takata airbag replacements under the Mandatory Recall Notice issued by the Australian Government.

More than 350,000 faulty Takata airbags were replaced in the quarter following 1 July 2018, equal to more than 3,000 replacements each day.

Some 2.5 million faulty Takata airbags have already been replaced in around 1.6 million vehicles to date, since the start of voluntary recalls in 2009.

Almost two million deadly Takata airbags still in Australian cars

The ACCC has released comprehensive state-by-state data detailing recall rates for deadly Takata airbags, and the first data detailing progress made by various vehicle manufacturers in removing them from Australian cars.

The ACCC says one year since the ACCC started overseeing the Takata airbag recall,
1.8 million potentially deadly airbags still need replacing as part of a compulsory recall that will run until 2020.

Over the past 12 months, 1.1 million faulty Takata airbags have been replaced in around 930,000 vehicles.

2,300km of dangerous Infinity electrical cable remains in homes

Thousands of homes across Australia still have faulty Infinity electrical cabling installed, despite recalls of all Infinity cables announced almost two years ago.

This dangerous cable could become prematurely brittle and break when placed under stress near heat sources and roof access areas, which may lead to electric shock or a fire if the cables are disturbed by tradespeople or home owners.

ACCC puts electricians and builders on notice that they must replace unsafe Infinity cables

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission is urging electricians and builders to replace dangerous Infinity electrical cables that were installed in up to 40,000 homes and businesses throughout Australia.

The cables fail to meet safety standards due to poor quality plastic insulation coating. Tests have shown that the cable may become prematurely brittle from 2016 onwards, which could cause fires or electric shock if the cables are then disturbed.

How to conduct a successful recall

A factsheet explaining how to conduct a successful product recall to ensure the message reaches all affected people.