Scams

Businesses lost an average of $10,000 to scams in 2016

Nearly 6000 businesses reported being targeted by scams in 2016 according to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s Targeting Scams report, with losses totalling around $3.8 million, an increase of almost 31 per cent.

The highest losses were to computer hacking, fake investment schemes and buying and selling scams, according to reports made to Scamwatch over the past year.

Targeting scams: report of the ACCC on scam activity 2016

This report explains key trends in scam activity and highlights the impact of scams on the community.

Don’t get scammed by dodgy internet pop-ups

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission is warning people to watch out for dodgy internet pop-up windows claiming there are viruses or other seemingly nasty tech problems affecting their computer.

Known as remote access scams, these pop-up windows are used as a ploy to get unsuspecting victims to call a fake support line – usually a 1800 number. The scammer will then ask for remote access to their victim’s computer to ‘find out what the problem is’.

Don't give your heart to a scammer this Valentine's Day

The ACCC is warning people to be wary of scammers when looking for romance online with social media now the most common method scammers use to contact potential victims.

In 2016, 4100 Australians contacted the ACCC’s Scamwatch service to report dating and romance scams and more than $25 million was lost: the largest amount of money lost to any type of scam. Stats also show Facebook is a popular contact method used by romance scammers, and that those aged 45 and over are most likely to be affected.

Don’t accept gifts from a scammer this Christmas

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission is warning online shoppers to watch out for fake parcel delivery scams arriving in email inboxes this Christmas.

The ACCC’s Scamwatch has received over 4,300 complaints about this scam in 2016, more than triple the number received in 2015. 

The ACCC says 350 people reported providing their personal information to scammers, including bank account details.