Product Safety

Honda and Mitsubishi recall 42,000 cars due to serious airbag safety risk

Honda and Mitsubishi have commenced voluntary recalls for vehicles manufactured between 1996 and 2000 due to a serious safety concern relating to faulty airbags.

These vehicles may have been fitted with potentially deadly Takata NADI 5-AT airbags. There is a risk these airbags may misdeploy in an accident and cause metal fragments to propel out of the airbag at high speed, resulting in serious injuries or death to vehicle occupants. There is also a risk that these airbags may under-inflate. 

Clarification: Toyota, Mazda and Suzuki join new airbag safety recall

Toyota, Mazda and Suzuki have today issued voluntary recalls of more than 18,000 vehicles manufactured between 1996 and 1999, including the popular Toyota Starlets, offering to buy back affected vehicles.

These vehicles are fitted with potentially deadly Takata NADI 5-AT airbags.

“These airbags could injure or kill people in the car by misdeploying in an accident and propelling parts or metal fragments into the cabin of the vehicle at high speed,” ACCC Acting Chair Stephen Ridgeway said.

Consumers warned of new airbag safety risk

The ACCC is warning Australian consumers about a new safety risk in using certain vehicles fitted with a different type of faulty Takata airbag. These airbags, which are fitted with a NADI 5-AT propellant, are not captured under the existing compulsory recall of Takata airbags. 

There is a serious safety risk that these NADI airbags may misdeploy in an accident, which may cause metal fragments to propel out of the airbag at high speed, causing serious injuries or death to vehicle occupants. There is also a risk that these airbags may under-inflate. 

Stay safe on quad bikes and side by side vehicles

Since 2011, 136 people have died as a result of quad bike accidents, while thousands more have been seriously injured, and the ACCC is urging people to be vigilant about safety when using quad bikes and side-by-side vehicles (SSV) this summer.

Over 60 per cent of these deaths were the result of a rollover, commonly resulting in the rider receiving fatal crush injuries or asphyxiating because they were pinned beneath the quad bike.

Dangerous Takata airbag recall 85 per cent complete

Vehicle manufacturers have replaced 85 per cent of affected Takata airbags but the ACCC is urging people not to become complacent as the holiday period approaches. 

About 3.5 million airbags have now been rectified in about 2.53 million vehicles, leaving roughly 371,000 airbags in 323,000 vehicles remaining for replacement.

“As we approach the festive season and people prepare to go on holidays, we’re urging everyone to make sure their car is safe,” ACCC Deputy Chair Delia Rickard said.  

Big Red Jacks pays penalty for alleged breach of mandatory safety standard

Hai Feng International Pty Ltd, trading as Big Red Jacks Tools & Equipment (Big Red Jacks), has paid a penalty of $12,600 after the ACCC issued an infringement notice. 

The ACCC issued the infringement notice because it had reasonable grounds to believe that Big Red Jacks had supplied a vehicle jack that did not comply with the Consumer Product Safety Standard for Vehicle Jacks.

Over a million recalled products still in circulation in Australia

Australians could be at risk of injuries or even death from 6.6 million individual products currently under voluntary recall, new figures show.

Figures show that each year the ACCC is notified of about 650 consumer product recalls, but only about half of affected products are returned to sellers. Excluding motor vehicle recalls, this amounts to about 1.7 million recalled products remaining in people’s homes, or almost one in four Australian households exposed to potential hazards.

ACCC welcomes new quad bike safety standard

The ACCC has welcomed the Federal Government’s decision to improve the safety of quad bikes by introducing a new safety standard.

The decision was announced by Assistant Treasurer the Hon Michael Sukkar today.

The safety standard has three elements: improved information for potential purchasers, enhanced quad bike stability, and rollover protection to reduce injuries and deaths.

The standard requires that within 12 months, all new quad bikes will need to have information affixed to them about the degree of slope at which they will start to overturn.