Product Safety

Mercedes-Benz failed to initiate a recall of some vehicles with faulty Takata airbags

The ACCC has accepted a court-enforceable undertaking from Mercedes-Benz Australia/Pacific Pty Ltd (Mercedes-Benz), after Mercedes-Benz acknowledged it had failed to initiate a recall of certain C class and E class vehicles with faulty Takata airbags, due to spare parts availability, in accordance with the timeframe required under the Takata compulsory recall.

Penalties for allegedly selling or advertising recalled cars with dangerous Takata airbags

Three corporations, Grays Ecommerce Group Limited (Grays), Berwick Motor Group Pty Ltd (BMG) and HG Innovations Pty Ltd (HG Innovations), have paid penalties totalling $63,000 after the ACCC issued infringement notices against each business for allegedly selling or advertising vehicles under active recall as part of the Takata compulsory recall of vehicles fitted with defective Takata airbags.   

More than 250,000 vehicles with defective Takata airbags remaining for replacement

About 3.56 million defective Takata airbags have now been replaced as part of the compulsory recall, but more than seven per cent remain outstanding and the ACCC is urging consumers not to ignore or delay responding to recall notices.   

Figures released today show about 3.56 million airbags in 2.59 million vehicles were rectified as at the end of December 2019, with around 300,000 airbags in 256,000 vehicles still outstanding.

Honda and Mitsubishi recall 42,000 cars due to serious airbag safety risk

Honda and Mitsubishi have commenced voluntary recalls for vehicles manufactured between 1996 and 2000 due to a serious safety concern relating to faulty airbags.

These vehicles may have been fitted with potentially deadly Takata NADI 5-AT airbags. There is a risk these airbags may misdeploy in an accident and cause metal fragments to propel out of the airbag at high speed, resulting in serious injuries or death to vehicle occupants. There is also a risk that these airbags may under-inflate. 

Clarification: Toyota, Mazda and Suzuki join new airbag safety recall

Toyota, Mazda and Suzuki have today issued voluntary recalls of more than 18,000 vehicles manufactured between 1996 and 1999, including the popular Toyota Starlets, offering to buy back affected vehicles.

These vehicles are fitted with potentially deadly Takata NADI 5-AT airbags.

“These airbags could injure or kill people in the car by misdeploying in an accident and propelling parts or metal fragments into the cabin of the vehicle at high speed,” ACCC Acting Chair Stephen Ridgeway said.

Consumers warned of new airbag safety risk

The ACCC is warning Australian consumers about a new safety risk in using certain vehicles fitted with a different type of faulty Takata airbag. These airbags, which are fitted with a NADI 5-AT propellant, are not captured under the existing compulsory recall of Takata airbags. 

There is a serious safety risk that these NADI airbags may misdeploy in an accident, which may cause metal fragments to propel out of the airbag at high speed, causing serious injuries or death to vehicle occupants. There is also a risk that these airbags may under-inflate. 

Stay safe on quad bikes and side by side vehicles

Since 2011, 136 people have died as a result of quad bike accidents, while thousands more have been seriously injured, and the ACCC is urging people to be vigilant about safety when using quad bikes and side-by-side vehicles (SSV) this summer.

Over 60 per cent of these deaths were the result of a rollover, commonly resulting in the rider receiving fatal crush injuries or asphyxiating because they were pinned beneath the quad bike.