ACCC & AER annual report 2016-17

Making the most of our diversity

The ACCC/AER recognises and embraces the benefits of a diverse workforce and the role of diversity within the Australian community. The Diversity Reference Group provides a support mechanism for ensuring that all aspects of diversity are represented across the agency. We have multicultural; disability; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander; and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) champions. The LGBTIQ champion heads the Ally Network, which forms part of the ACCC/AER’s ongoing commitment to a policy of zero tolerance of discrimination and bullying within the workplace. The Ally Network consists of 100 employees at all levels of the organisation and raises awareness of LGBTIQ issues.

In 2016–17 the ACCC/AER Reconciliation Action Plan 2016–18 (RAP) was approved by Reconciliation Australia. The RAP recognises the importance of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as one of the ACCC’s and AER’s key stakeholders and outlines initiatives to raise awareness of ACCC and AER functions in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, with a view to improving their consumer experience. The RAP also commits the ACCC to increasing the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees.

In 2016–17 we signed up to the Australian Public Service Commission’s Indigenous Employment Services memorandum of understanding, which provides access to a variety of employment services and support networks for Indigenous employment. We employed six interns through the CareerTrackers Indigenous internship program and two interns through the Indigenous Australian Government Development Program. A candidate of the Australian Government Indigenous Graduate Recruitment Program was successfully inducted into the 2017 ACCC and AER Graduate Program. An ACCC employee completed a secondment with Jawun, a not-for-profit organisation that manages secondments from corporate and government partners to Indigenous organisations.

Gender diversity and flexibility have also been a focus for 2016–17. A significant number of our employees work under flexible work arrangements. Flexible work practices, including part-time, job sharing, and compressed work hours, enable our employees to balance their unique and changing needs during different life and career stages. In 2016–17 we reviewed and updated our policies, with a particular focus on improving our participation rates in flexible work practices.

Table 4.6: Workplace diversity profile at 30 June 2017

 

Total number

Female

ATSI

CLDB

PWD

SES and ACCC/AER members

49

16

 

1

 

APS1

15

11

5

 

 

APS2

2

1

 

 

 

APS3

32

21

2

7

2

APS4

80

53

2

16

2

APS5

148

88

2

33

3

APS6

188

110

2

47

6

EL1

191

96

1

22

4

EL2

166

80

2

16

1

GRAD

27

14

2

4

5

Totals

898

490

18

146

23

Proportion of the total (%)

 

54.6%

2.0%

16.3%

2.6%

ATSI = people from Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander backgrounds; CLDB = people from culturally or linguistically diverse backgrounds; PWD = people with disabilities. A staff member could be classified under one, two or all three of these headings. All the classifications are self-identified.

Disability employment

The ACCC/AER continued its commitment to the National Disability Strategy 2010–2020, which sets out a 10-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with a disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. Our 2017 graduate cohort includes four graduates who were selected through the RecruitAbility scheme, an initiative of the Australian Public Service Commission that aims to attract and develop applicants with a disability.

In 2016–17 we engaged one intern through the Stepping Into disability program, a paid internship scheme operated by the Australian Network on Disability, which finds placements for university students with a disability. One employee was recruited through Disability Employment Services, which helps people with a disability find employment.

Disability reporting

Since 1994, Commonwealth non-corporate entities have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007–08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available at www.apsc.gov.au. From 2010–11, entities have no longer been required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by the National Disability Strategy 2010–2020, which sets out a 10-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high-level two-yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the strategy and present a picture of how people with disability are faring. The first of these reports was published in late 2014, and can be found at www.dss.gov.au.

Enterprise agreement

The ACCC/AER negotiated a revised enterprise agreement and a majority of employees who voted in the ballot agreed to accept it. The ACCC Enterprise Agreement 2016–2019 came into effect in December 2016.

Employment agreements

Senior executive remuneration

Remuneration for ACCC and AER members is determined by the Remuneration Tribunal in accordance with:

  • the Remuneration Tribunal Act 1973
  • Determination 2016/19, Remuneration and Allowances for Holders of Full-Time Public Office
  • Determination 2015/20, Remuneration and Allowances for Holders of Part-Time Public Office.

Tables 4.7 and 4.8 set out the nature and amount of remuneration for ACCC and AER members.

Table 4.7: Remuneration of members of the ACCC at 30 June 2017

Full-time

Position

Base salary

 

Total remuneration of office

 

Chair

$511 800

 

$731 140

 

Deputy Chair

$383 860

 

$548 360

 

Member

$329 020

 

$470 020

Part-time

Position

Base salary

 

Total remuneration of office

 

Associate Member

$251 600

*

$290 346

* Associate members who are state or territory members of the AER and other associate members who may serve on an ad hoc basis are paid a daily fee if and when they attend Commission meetings.

Table 4.8: Remuneration of members of the AER at 30 June 2017

Full-time

Position

Base salary

Total remuneration of office

 

AER Chair

$365 570

$522 240

 

AER Board Member

$285 930

$391 680

Determinations

SES employees are subject to individual determinations covering remuneration, leave and a range of other employment conditions. Determinations are made in accordance with the Public Service Act 1999.

Common law contracts and Australian Workplace Agreements

No employees are covered by common law contracts or Australian Workplace Agreements.

Table 4.9: Number of employees covered by each industrial instrument at 30 June 2017

 

ACCC Enterprise Agreement 2011–2014

Individual flexibility agreements

Section 24 determinations

APS1

15

0

0

APS2

2

0

0

APS3

32

0

0

APS4

80

0

0

APS5

148

2

0

APS6

188

6

0

EL1

191

14

0

EL2

165

37

1

SES B1

0

0

30

SES B2

0

0

9

SES B3

0

0

1

GRAD

27

0

0

Table 4.10: Salary ranges for APS employees at 30 June 2017

 

ACCC Enterprise Agreement 2011–2014

Section 24

APS1

$46 175–$51 037

APS2

$52 255–$57 945

APS3

$59 516–$64 241

APS4

$66 340–$72 028

APS5

$73 992–$78 457

APS6

$81 903–$91 799

EL1

$101 761–$112 619

EL2

$117 975–$138 256

$159 144

SES 1

$180 327–$197 760

SES 2

$240 545–$262 650

SES 3

$323 520

L1

$64 241–$126 588

L2

$133 776–$141 794

GRAD

$57 945–$66 340

Table 4.11: Performance pay

 

SES B1

SES B2

SES B3*

ACCC*

Number who received bonus

28

9

1

38

Total bonus

$369 393

$198 180

$567 573

Average bonus

$13 193

$22 020

$15 340

Range

$2 931–$16 085

$18 963–$26 717

$2 931–$26 717

As at 30 June 2017 the ACCC had only one Senior Executive Service Band 3 employee; therefore these details have been omitted to protect privacy.